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Tuesday, March 22, 2005

The read/write web and teaching

This post is meant as a Welcome Activity for the LBUSD teachers who are learning about blogs on March 22nd, 2005.

Since the early nineties, educators have had access to the world wide web, but most web sites have been read-only. That is, we can read them, but in most cases we cannot edit them or create them.

Consider what it would mean if you were able to write to the world wide web as easily as you read from it.

What if you could create content as easily as consume it?

What if your students could as well?

How might your teaching practice (and students' learning process) change if this were true?


As a mental exercise, please consider this by yourself for two minutes. Then share your thoughts with a person sitting beside you (if applicable), and after about 2 minutes of discussion, please add a comment to this post and share your thoughts with the rest of the class, and the world.

To add a comment to this post, just click on comments in the lower right corner of this post. A new window will open, providing you with a place to type your comment. If you do not have a blogger account yet, you may post anonymously... though you may still include your name in your comment.

I look forward to reading your comments.

-Mark

14 Comments:

At 3:45 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I have no idea how my teaching practice would change.

 
At 3:45 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I would not want to talk with my students on line!!

 
At 3:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I would never use it for personal use since I do not think of myself as a writer. But it could be an easy way to communicate with parents or the students in my classroom.

 
At 3:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Here is a typical teacher comment: I believe you should add a "t" to the word mean on the first line. I think you meant ----'meant.'
Students could respond to homework questions online. Teachers could post homework assignments. This is all assuming that students have access to the internet.
Kim Adams

 
At 3:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I feel that I can create information for students that were not present in class on that particular day.

 
At 3:46 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Students would be able to seek clarification about content understanding as well as any changes to assignments, etc.

Students may also work with one another in finding different approaches to problem solving.

 
At 3:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Students would have access to changes in rehearsal schedules and call times, however it would rely on students being diligent in checking the site. Parents would have more immediate access to changes in schedule which would be beneficial for students who don't drive.

 
At 3:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I believe that there would be more fluency and communication in our program between families and teachers. However, the immediate access would have its pros and cons for teachers.

 
At 3:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This is my first exposure to blogging so I haven't really any idea on how I would use this as a teacher.

 
At 3:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

The chicken sticks are great. I suggest you try them! How do we keep students from abusing the system just as I am? I guess I don't really understand "blogging."

 
At 3:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Students would be able to seek extra help from me as well as other students. This is a great way to share ideas about the bigger picture of the subject matter (content) as well as problem solving strategies.
However, a lot of responsiblity would be put on the student to check the blog (?) in order for it to really work.

 
At 3:47 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

Students would be able to seek extra help from me as well as other students. This is a great way to share ideas about the bigger picture of the subject matter (content) as well as problem solving strategies.
However, a lot of responsiblity would be put on the student to check the blog (?) in order for it to really work.

 
At 3:50 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

This would be a great format to post a research question of the week for the library media center or discuss new books.

 
At 3:59 PM, Anonymous Anonymous said...

I am excited to be learning but not sure how it will affect the class (2nd Graders). Looks good so far!

 

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